Carne Asada Taco

Do you love some good Mexican tacos? We do but Eric loves loves loves him some Mexican food… So we make Mexican food pretty often and this Carne Asada Taco recipe is a favorite because guess what it’s easy. Are you getting a picture with most of our favorite recipes? They are easy to make…

Carne Asada Taco Recipe

Here is the recipe we use for Carne Asada Tacos.

Carne Asada Taco
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Prep Time
1 hr 10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
1 hr 20 min
Prep Time
1 hr 10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
1 hr 20 min
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  2. 2 tablespoons lime juice
  3. 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  4. 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  5. 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  6. 1 pound carne asada beef or flank steak
  7. 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  8. 2 cloves minced garlic
  9. 1 gallon zip-lock bag
Instructions
  1. Place oil, lime juice, cumin, salt, and pepper into zip-lock bag and mix together. Place beef, onions, and garlic into zip-lock bag, Close bag and with hands, massage beef until evenly coated. Place in refrigerator and marinade for at least 1 hour or overnight.
  2. Grill beef until browned, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a cutting board to rest for 5 minutes then cut into thin slices.
  3. Serve warm with your choice of toppings in a soft tortilla shell.
Adapted from Picky Palate
Adapted from Picky Palate
TwoFeetFirst http://www.twofeetfirst.net/
 The only thing you need to do with this recipe is plan ahead because you need to marinate the meat before hand.

Carne Asada Taco

Then you put the meat on the grill and cook, which only takes a couple of minutes per side because its skinny meat. After the meat is done cooking cut it into slices and serve… It’s that easy! 

Carne Asada Taco Recipe

Anyone else love them some Tacos? Whats your favorite Mexican food recipe? I am always looking for new ones.

Insulating Basement Walls

Have you ever walked into a cinder block basement in the winter?  Let me tell you it can be cold, cold, cold. And if you did not notice our basement is all cinder block, so in winter it gets cold. In the closet that is right below our front porch (which is also known as a cold storage room) it is completely surrounded by cinder block and cement and it gets cold in the winter. But along with the cold, we also get condensation on the ceiling and walls because of the warmer basement air hitting the cold cinder block or cement. We had originally talked about adding a vent to the room and installing an exterior door. But after lots of research we were finding that this did not solve the problem most of the time. It was suggested to insulate the room and make it part of the basement. So here we are insulating our cinder block walls under our front porch.

Here is a great website on info on how to finish a basement wall, this is where we found our info from. *** Plus we are NO experts, this is the process we used after lots of research. 

But before we could insulate we had to do some prep work by repainting the cinder block walls to make sure the walls are waterproofed, you can find that here

We want to save all the floor space we can in our basement so we decided to use 2×2’s instead of the normally used 2×4’s. So we will be showing how we saved floor space and insulated our basement walls.

Materials Needed:

  • Waterproofing Paint & Hydro Cement (this step here)
  • 3/4″- 1″ Foamular 150 Insulation (we used 1″)
  • 1 1/2″ Polystryene Insulation
  • Foam Tape (make sure it’s waterproof)
  • Foam Adhesive (we used Liquid Nails Foam Adhesive)
  • 2″ x 2″ boards
  • Treated 2″ x 4″ boards (used for the bottom of the framing)
  • 3 1/4″ Cement Screws
  • 4″ Cement Screws
  • Drill plus wood drill bit
  • Rotary Hammer Drill plus masonry drill bit
  • Level
  • Tape Measure
  • Miter Saw
  • Window Foam
  • Sheetrock
  • Sheetrock Screws 

 Here is our stack of insulation, plus our messy room…

insulate basement walls to save floor space

The first step of adding the insulation was adding the pink/purple Foamular 150 Insulation. To do this we used liquid nails panel & foam (you want to make sure it says foam on the adhesive). 

Foam liquid nails

We cut the insulation to the size of the wall and make sure it fit into place before adding the adhesive. We used our razor blade to cut the foam. To add the adhesive, we applied a 1/4″ bead from the top of the foam to the bottom, one straight line. Adding a bead 1″ away from the sides and about every 10″ in-between. Then we pressed the foam into place. Here is our closet with all the pink foam added, you can see where we cut things a little short at the bottom of the foam but nothing a little window foam cannot fix…

insulate basement walls to save floor space

Next we taped the insulation sides together, in other words we taped every seam… We also applied the window foam to the bottom of the foam panels. This process is to make sure no air seeps in-between the foam and the foundation. 

insulate basement walls to save floor space

Next is adding the framing for the walls, to do this we needed to drill into the cinder block to attach the wood. To make life so so much easier we used the Bosch Rotary Hammer, you can see more of our adventure here.

drill through cement

 First we placed the treated 2×4’s on the floor having the 2″ side on the floor. We measured the space, cut the wood and then checked to make sure everything would fit. After we were sure the wood would fit, we used our regular drill, with a wood drill bit, and drilled holes into the wood (this is for the screws). Making sure we placed a drill hole at the edges of the wood plus about every 12-18″. 

insulate basement walls

After drilling through the wood, we then used the rotary hammer drill and drilled into the cement/cinder block. The nice thing about our drill is that it has a depth gauge on the drill, so you know when to stop drilling. To do this, we would place the wood in the desired location and drill the hole using the previous hole drilled as your guide. After drilling the hole, we then attached the wood with the 4″ concrete screw. It may seem that you could skip the previous step but using a masonry drill bit on wood will only dull the drill bit quicker.

After attaching the 2×4, we then attached the 2×2 using the same drilling method but used the 3 1/4″ screws. But placing two at the corners and placing every 12-16″ apart, also making sure the boards are level. We also adding more liquid nails to each board before screwing into place but this was over kill… We placed two boards at the corners to give the Sheetrock something to screw into.

insulate basement walls to save floor space

After adding all the framing, we then adding the white insulation foam in-between the 2×2’s just like we adding the other insulation. Filling any gaps with window foam…

insulate basement walls to save floor space

After adding all the foam insulation, we added our drywall or sheetrock, whatever you want to call it. And there are so many cuts in the sheetrock because we had to get the sheets into a small door opening. 

Drywall adding to closet

insulate basement walls to save floor space

Now we need to finish the sheetrock and it has been sitting like this for about 2 months. Maybe we will get to it soon. But does anyone else want to insulate their basement? Because I want to insulate my whole basement…

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How to Drill Holes into Cinder Block

Have you ever tried to drill into cinder block or cement with a regular drill? It’s hard, tiring and frustrating. But let’s start with a little back story on how we came to know this…

One lovely day we decided it was time to insulate one of the rooms in our basement (really just a little closet). After some research, we decided to use foam insulation with 2×2 boards. But the boards would have to be secured to the cinder block, meaning we needed to drill into the cinder block. We bought our supplies (which included masonry screws and a masonry drill bit) and started the project thinking this would take no time to complete. But we got a big slap in the face when we started attaching the wood to the cinder block. After hours of drill into the cinder block, we only had maybe 4 finished holes. We were frustrated…

So we got on the internet that night trying to find a solution, we decided to try a hammer drill. The next day we bought one and came home to give it a try. And again hours later we maybe had 10 finished holes drilled (this worked better than the regular drill but still not easy). We were even switching drill bits often… After about one hole the new bit was shot.

Why were we having so much difficultly? We watched lots of videos of people drilling into cement and they did not have this much trouble, they made it look easy. What are we doing wrong?

We continued using the process for a couple of days not really getting anywhere. Getting even more frustrated and wondering how we were ever going to finish our whole basement.

But one night I decided to look up how to work a hammer drill because I was beginning to think we were using it wrong. But I found this amazing video called rotary hammer vs. hammer drill. I was hoping I found our answer, we needed a rotary hammer drill. Showed Eric the video and we decided it would not hurt anything to try.

So we took back our hammer drill (because it was not working for us) and we got the Bosch Rotary Hammer Drill plus a drill bit. Then after saying a few prayer, we tried the rotary hammer. After the first hole we looked at each other in amazement, this was our answer!! We completed 3-4 holes in the times it took us to complete 1. And it was easy to use! Before we were using all of our strength (wondering why we went to the gym that day) but now we were using nothing, just holding the drill in place. AMAZING! We finally attached all the wood to the wall within a couple of hours after switching. And we only used one drill bit.

drill through cement

I am writing this post in hopes that this will save others time and frustration when trying to drill into cinder block or cement. So if you are wondering how to drill through cinder block or cement, the answer is a ROTARY hammer drill! It will make your project go a lot smoother.

insulate basement walls to save floor space

Anyone wanting to finish their basement? Or do you need to drill lots of holes into cement? I really hope this will help.

Homemade Waffles

My family loves breakfast food and well we eat it for dinner a lot of the time. Does anyone else do this? It really is an easy meal… One breakfast food we like to make is waffles.

Make Waffle

And it’s even better when you add a berry syrup.

Waffle Recipe

You will need a waffle maker to make this recipe. Here is our simple homemade waffle recipe.

Homemade Waffles
An easy homemade waffle...
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 eggs
  2. 1 1/2 cup milk
  3. 6 tbsp butter (melted)
  4. 1 tbsp sugar
  5. 3 tsp baking powder
  6. 1/2 tsp salt
  7. 2 cups flour
Instructions
  1. In a bowl, mix eggs,sugar & milk together. Next add the butter, baking powder, salt, and flour. Mix until well combined.
  2. Pour desired amount onto waffle maker and cook desired amount of time. Enjoy your waffle!
TwoFeetFirst http://www.twofeetfirst.net/
Homemade Waffle Recipe

Anyone else enjoy making breakfast for dinner? Or is that just us?